What Advertising Lacks Today and Why So Many Agencies Miss the Mark

When the founders of Accelerator started out in business, it wasn’t to make a fast buck. They knew that it would take years, maybe even decades of providing a higher level of client service, delivering bankable results, and foregoing fast cash in order to always provide a better bottom line to clients instead of themselves.

Recognition and awards were placed low priority; sacrificing time, energy, talent, and yes, even billings (whether clients recognized it or not) became the working model much to the dismay of Accelerator’s founders, bankers and families.

An example: When agencies across America were gouging gullible clients for designing and programming complex and often times laughably monstrous websites, Accelerator recommended that its clients create appealing, simplistic websites without the bells and whistles, because our research showed that while web visitors were amused by flashy intro pages and animations, the real reason they were visiting the website was for content, not entertainment. Thus, our recommendations to start small, focus on great content, and worry less about the flash were solid. Our recommendations saved our clients money and provided a level of client satisfaction and loyalty that no amount of programming billings could buy. In fact, most of the early websites we designed for our clients eight or nine years ago, still look and feel as if they were done yesterday and still draw many positive visitor comments.

Timo Matero and Marc Obregon believe in the virtues of hard work. They believe that slow and steady wins the race. And that results for the client and community are more important than a corner suite of glimmering high-rise offices.

Here at Accelerator, we believe that today’s advertising players lack a sense of history and no role models to pattern their professional pursuits. There is no anchor for ethics, virtues, or morals for many of the current advertising firms. Leadership is lacking in the boardroom all the way down to the junior who thinks there is nothing wrong with browsing Facebook and texting friends all the day long while client change requests pile up. They miss the importance of the fundamentals, and so miss the mark.

Tsk. Tsk. Tsk. Accelerator thinks our industry can do better. We ask them to follow our lead. Forego media commissions in lieu of planning fees. Look for ways to partner with clients in a revenue sharing option. Scour talent from outside the usual avenues. Do what you say you will, and have it ready when you said you would at the price you estimated. Is it really that hard? Apparently it is. Perhaps that is why so many world brands engage Accelerator to become a creative services partner.

We thought that you might like to know who some of our role models are who inspire everyone of us here at Accelerator Advertising (research thanks to www.advertisinghalloffame.org):

David Ogilvy

David Ogilvy

Arguably advertising’s most successful ad man. His influence on modern marketing been so large that Advertising Age called him “one of the greatest creative minds in the advertising business,” and Time recognized him as “the most sought-after wizard in the advertising business.”
Successful campaigns for Hathaway Shirts, Rolls-Royce, Schweppes and others made Ogilvy an international ad powerhouse. And with such a reputation he had many credits for being first. The first foreign advertising agency to gain access to the Soviet Union, and was the first major agency to implement fee-based compensation.

Ogilvy authored books that became classic texts and must reads for any one involved in advertising. Ogilvy dedicated his talents to the arts as a director of the New York Philharmonic, Chairman at Lincoln Center and as a trustee of Colby College.

Elected to the Copywriters Hall of Fame in 1963, made a Commander of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II in 1967, and honored as Officer of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government in 1991.

J. Walter Thompson

J. Walter Thompson

Pioneered many of the agency practices and procedures that serve as the foundation of the modern advertising industry. 
Some examples include media billing, testimonial ads, the use of demographics and the behavioral sciences. This scientific approach transformed advertising, marketing, and business on a global scale.

Raymond Rubicam

Raymond Rubicam

Revolutionized advertising by using research to create marketing messages that “mirrored the reader”. Donated much of his company’s time and resources to the WWII efforts in order help win the war at home and abroad.

Leo Burnett

Leo Burnett

With a career spanning 56 years, Burnett’s achievements are legendary. He started his own agency in 1935 at the depths of the Depression and saw it grow into the fourth largest agency in the U.S. and the fifth largest in the world. He developed a variety of advertising concepts, including “getting noticed naturally, without screaming and without tricks.”

Burnett received many awards and worked tirelessly on many civic projects. He received honors for accomplishments in wartime advertising in 1945 and for work with the Freedoms Foundation in 1949. He directed the nonpartisan Register and Vote Campaign for the Advertising Council and was given the Special Merit Award by the New York Art Directors Club and was co-recipient of the Annual Gold Medal Award. Despite his monumental contributions to the advertising industry, Burnett still made time for public-service projects that changed people’s lives.

John Caples

John Caples

The famous copywriter and developer of the Caples Formula whose mail-order advertising skills earned him a place in advertising history. Caples developed new methods of testing advertising by using scientific techniques that he outlined in four books he had written. His belief that simple words can be powerful words, an emphasis on the importance of headlines and a focus on directness also characterized his approach toward copy that was intended to sell and get results.

Jay Chiat

Jay Chiat

Co-Founder Chiat/Day – Chiat introduced account planning to the United States and believed that the working environment had a substantial impact not only on the creative process but also on overall agency management. His belief in “architectural management” led him to create the first “virtual office” where award winning creative campaigns for Apple, Energizer, and Reebok were conceived.

Chiat also became a leader in community welfare, the environment and the arts. He was one of the founders of the Advertising Industry Emergency Fund and donated more than $300,000 to fund training and internship programs such as the Los Angeles-based Minority Advertising Training Program to encourage minority opportunities in advertising. Chiat also supported the agency’s pro bono work for clients such as Art Against AIDS, the Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Heal the Bay, the Homeless Coalition and the Blind Children’s Center.

Raymond Mithun

Raymond Mithun

Co-founded Campell-Mithun at the age of 23 and provided the far reaching vision and setting of benchmarks for almost every advertising agency thereafter. Mithun’s personal credo is among the reasons for the growth of both the agency he co-founded and the ad industry as a whole. “You’re put here to do a job and the job’s the boss,” he said. “We’re here to help other people be productive and to leave the world a better place than when we came in.” Mithun founded numerous schools and scholarships for the betterment of the arts and the world.

David Sarnoff

David Sarnoff

Almost single-handedly created the modern radio and television media outlets. Instrumental in the creation of RCA, NBC, and many other outlets. Recognized by Time Magazine as one of the 20th century’s most influential people. Served America in the theaters of WWII by creating and implementing electronic news coverage for D-Day and the liberation of Paris.

But what about Timo Matero and Marc Obregon?
Well their careers are just about half way through by now. Will they be listed among these great leaders? Only time will tell.

But you can be assured they share these leaders’ solid commitment to clients, community, and ethics.
“People that squander opportunity shouldn’t be given any,” says Timo Matero. “You give Accelerator an opportunity to make you look good, and boost your bottom line, plus help people in the process, and we’ll do whatever it takes to make that happen.”

Author: Mr. Timo Matero, Founder and Director, Accelerator Advertising, Inc.